Jan 30 2008

Povetkin -Chambers Proved that Boxing Is 90% Mental.

Those with a lot of experience in the fight game know that boxing is 90% mental. Getting in great shape doesn’t guarantee anything. If any of you watched the Povetkin-Chambers fight you witnessed that first hand.

Chambers started off very fast. He continually beat Povetkin to the punch as Povetkin’s frustration showed. Chambers looked confident, cool, relaxed, while in between rounds it looked like Povetkin was a chain smoker! The dude was huffing and puffing like he smoked three packs a day!

The turn in the fight came when Povetkin forced his will on Chambers. Although it looked like Alexander was going to hyperventilating in the corner he continued to out worked Eddie as he took over the fight. Eddie just stopped fighting?! He had no answer. Many are still baffled by this. What happened? Why couldn’t he answer back with his own will? Was it the big stage and HBO lights? Lack of big fight experience? People have to understand, that it’s a tug of war of wills in a fight. Evander Holyfield said it best when saying ” The fight starts when both men are tired”

Eddie’s father and Buddy McGirt couldn’t get through to Eddie in between rounds. It was Eddie’s mindset. Only he could flip the switch back on. He just didn’t do it. His hunger wasn’t there. Povetkin it seemed took Eddie’s will and ground it up.

Remember, It’s not how you start the fight, it’s how you finish. Povetkin was the mentally stronger fighter in the fight as the out come proved. He showed why boxing is boxing is 90% mental.

Visit www. boxingperformance.com to learn how to prep right for a fight.


Jan 21 2008

Shadow boxing with hand weights. Know why and how to use them in your boxing training.

I just had to repost this reply I gave about shadow boxing with hand weights awhile ago. In the gym today, I see some guys using too much weight and I think throwing punches.

These are my thoughts on the use of hand weights in your boxing training.

Q: Whats the bottom line on shadow boxing with light weights like 2lb, productive or not.

Straight up question i know, I’ve heard a lot of people discuss this my trainer has me do it, i respect him a lot so i do whatever he says cause he hasn’t led me wrong so far just want to see what you think about this. J

RP: As long as the weights don’t impede technique then no worries.


The last Rocky movie could have been the worst thing to happen to strength/conditioning fighters cause of the whacked shit Sly did in that flick.

Attempting to throw lame ass uppercuts with those heavy dumbbells and other not so cool looking methods look cutting edge to the misinformed but are you F****** kidding me are the thoughts to the ones in the know.

Trainers and fighters get the wrong idea when using loaded resistance while practicing technique.

It’s true SPP, as long as it grooves and enhances proper technique, skill, performance.

No disrespect to your trainer, but many trainers just use methods without knowing why or questioning, are they appropriate for my fighter at this stage? They should be able to educate their fighters this is why we are doing this so there is NO doubt, only total trust.

Bottom line, knowing what your doing, why,is it necessary? and when it should be done,usually will transfer.

Generally speaking, being to sport specific and loading the movement patters too aggressively defeats the purpose and retards performance by instilling poor motor engrams( movement patters) for which you are training.

Shadow boxing is meant for warming up J and grooving proper technique. Again as long as you are maintaining and really improving technique with the 2lb db’s you’ll be fine.

I know 2lbs doesn’t sound like much, but I wouldn’t make it a habit of always shadow boxing with hand weights.

Same goes when using the super bag gloves with the weights you can put in the wrist.. Be careful

You will know when you load yourself too much, as the body doesn’t lie.
Now you know the why to not do that J and you can armor yourself a bit now from the HEAVY bullshit out there…

The best and real coaches understand strength/conditioning and skill.

Click here http://boxingperformance.com/ to learn boxing skill and performance enhancing training.


Jan 7 2008

Does developing a big bench press in a boxer’s workout deliver big power?

I get asked this question a lot and I feel it’s long over due that I post my thoughts on this question.. Here is a post I answered on Elitefts.com fight corner concerning training with the bench press for increased punching power. Lets put this question to rest.

Rob, Taking into account weight training and it’s relationship to improving sport form whats your thoughts on accomodating resistance training for the bench press for improving punching? Kevin

Kevin…For improving punching power I focus more on training the lats, legs, and core.Since I’m a skill trainer I see improving technique ( a lot of fighters arm punch) along with the above enhances punching power BIG time.Fighters develop pronated shoulders, tight upper abdominals, and a kyphotic posture. Having fighters bench press on top of this wouldn’t be wise. Address the imbalances ( tight muscles,weak muscles) and punching power improves.

Mobility work in the hips and core will go along ways too.Kevin, Look at how a fighter punches. In fact go to youtube look at Gerald McClellan’s highlight clip( One of the hardest middleweight punchers ever ) and watch that nasty right hand of his put people to sleep watch where the power comes from, and tell me if bench pressing addresses where the power comes from and if it would have improved that hellacious punch of his even more.

The bench press is a good general exercise, but don’t expect to have a big punch along with a big bench. With the imbalances that fighters develop, it wouldn’t be a good general exercise to use until the imbalances are addressed.

Look closer at great punchers Kevin.